How To Migrate Web App To Azure

Deploy web applications on Azure to reduce time and resources spent on infrastructure management and increase time to cost for customers.

Digital engagement has evolved far beyond static web content, and customers expect rich interactivity, functionality and multi-channel experiences. With Azure’s fully managed services, you can focus your creativity and innovation on building apps that deliver a solid experience and improve revenue growth.

Azure platform services provide availability, scalability, security, and application infrastructure management to reduce the time spent on underlying resources.

 

Migrating Web Sites to Azure Web Apps

Deploy web applications on Azure to reduce time and resources spent on infrastructure management and increase time to cost for customers.

Digital engagement has evolved far beyond static web content, and customers expect rich interactivity, functionality and multi-channel experiences. With Azure’s fully managed services, you can focus your creativity and innovation on building apps that deliver a solid experience and improve revenue growth.

Azure platform services provide availability, scalability, security, and application infrastructure management to reduce the time spent on underlying resources.

 

Azure web application

Because Azure web applications are designed to be scaled, multiple instances often run. When running behind a load balancer, each request can be sent to one of the available instances, which may be different from the instance that contains the session state of the last request. If your web application currently uses current session management, you will need to modify it to store session data outside of the web application. Several options are available, but perhaps the most scalable option is to use Redis Cache.

Deploy Azure Application Insights

The entire legacy web application runs on site in a data center other than Azure. Either your own data center, the hosting provider’s data center, or any other location. Before deploying a full migration of legacy applications to Azure (in a production environment), it is important to have a clear idea of ​​how an application works in a production environment. Support for Application Insights (actually called Azure Monitor, but that’s another story) can be added to many legacy web applications with little to no code changes (specifically. For .NET and Java).

SQL Server Authentication

For enterprise applications, it is common to use Windows authentication between the website and SQL Server. This is a simple process because both servers run in the context of a network domain (or trusted domain). In Azure, web applications run in an unmanaged context and can be changed at any time. For this reason, we recommend that you use SQL Server authentication between Azure web applications and SQL Server.

Apply an HTTP Traffic Routing infrastructure Based on Azure

It is important to have a clearly defined endpoint for each web application. Web application consumers (web browsers for websites, REST clients for API applications) – The defined endpoint is called to always reach the target web application. Behind the scenes, you can hit a local web app or hit a newly migrated Azure instance of the same web app. But consumers of web applications don’t care. Consumers want to speak only to web applications, whether in Azure or on premise.

Azure web Application

Because Azure web applications are designed to be scaled, multiple instances often run. When running behind a load balancer, each request can be sent to one of the available instances, which may be different from the instance that contains the session state of the last request. If your web application currently uses current session management, you will need to modify it to store session data outside of the web application. Several options are available, but perhaps the most scalable option is to use Redis Cache.

Azure File Storage for File Sharing

Many websites allow users to upload files or content directly to the server’s local file system. However, this is a problem because the distributed nature of Azure expects the file to be found on the next request and does not exist. Instead, you need to upload the file to Azure Blog storage that is accessible to all running Azure Web App instances. It is not an easy task and does not always work in practice. It is assumed that you have already verified that your non-production environment (development, testing, quality assurance, etc.) works by migrating to Azure. And you don’t have to move the entire data layer to Azure at once (and probably not).